Pastor
Msgr. David C. Hubba
E-mail: office@sjcnj.org
(201) 261-0148 x11

Parochial Vicar
Fr. John Z. Radwan
E-mail: fatherjohn@sjcnj.org
(201) 261-0148 x12

Parochial Vicar
Fr. Christian Scalo
E-mail: fatherchristian@sjcnj.org
(201) 261-0148 x13

Deacon George Montalvo
E-mail: montalvog@sjcnj.org
(201) 261-1144

Sacramental Director
Arlene Kennedy
E-mail: kennedya@sjcnj.org
(201) 261-1144

Director of Music
Monroe Quinn
E-mail: quinnm@sjcnj.org
(201) 261-0148 x10

Youth Minister
Ellen Solinas
E-mail: Ellen@solinas.net       

SJS Principal
Dr. Paula Valenti
E-mail: valentip@sjsusa.org
(201) 261-2388


Tom Meli, Director of Operations for Saint Joseph Parish/School: melit@sjcnj.org
Phyllis Vrola, Parish Business Manager: vrolap@sjcnj.org
Diane Hellriegel, Bulletin Editor: hellriegeld@sjcnj.org
Gerry Carolan, Parish Secretary: carolang@sjcnj.org
Tom Moran, Sacristan

PRIEST BIOGRAPHIES

Monsignor David C. Hubba, Pastor
I was born in Liberty, NY, since my father found work at the Grossinger’s resort in the Catskills after World War II, when jobs were scarce. After a short stay in northeast Pennsylvania, we moved to Newark, where we lived, at various addresses, until I was in the middle of high school. After that, we moved to Kearny, because life in Newark had become a bit harrowing. I went to grammar school at St. Rose of Lima School in the Roseville section of the city that bordered East Orange. The parish, mostly Irish-Americans with some Italian-Americans, rapidly changed from one of the Archdiocese’s largest to a remnant left behind by the massive exodus that occurred around the time of the famous Newark riot. Around 1960, my friends and I could safely walk to downtown Newark to go to the movies, after taking on supplies of candy at the Woolworth or McCrory’s five-and-tens, where you could purchase by weight. Later, such excursions were impossible. St. Rose’s grammar school, staffed mostly by the Sisters of Charity, was a fine place to get the beginnings of an education, although we had no science lab or indoor gym. I’ve always thought that my priestly vocation was firmly rooted there, nurtured by the good work of the priests and sisters of the parish. I spent my high school years at Seton Hall Prep, then located on the campus of Seton Hall University in South Orange, an outstanding school. My extracurricular activity was the debating team, which enjoyed great success. Knowing I wanted to become a priest, I went to Seton Hall University, studying classical languages, then the mandatory major. My class spent two years there before completing our degrees and then four years taking theology at the Archdiocesan seminary, located in Mahwah at that time. I earned an MA in Biblical studies there, and, after ordination, another MA in Catholic doctrine at St. John’s University in New York together with a Pontifical diploma in Catechetics. After my deacon assignment in St. Mary’s in Nutley (1973-1974), our class was ordained in 1974. My priesthood assignments have been:
• Holy Trinity, Hackensack (1974-1990)
• O.L. of the Visitation, Paramus (1990-1996)
• St. Michael’s, Palisades Park (1996-1998)
• St. Mary’s, Nutley, pastor (1998-2010)
• Seton Hall University, as the college seminary Spiritual Director (2010-2013)
• Here at Saint Joseph (2013 and counting)


Father John Z. Radwan, Parochial Vicar

Every vocation is one of God’s great mysteries. In my case, my vocation started in the middle of my life, in my thirties. I was blessed to be born to parents who loved God and the Church. I was the fourth child in a line of six siblings. It was in this setting that I came to know God’s love. While it was my father who taught me how to pray the “Our Father,” it was my mother who reminded us all what we must do on Sundays. Highlights of my young life that I still remember very well were receiving my First Communion and finally being old enough to serve at Holy Mass (which I did for many years). In my young mind a priest was somebody who was always right, wise and holy. I did not think seriously about becoming a priest in my younger years. After completing high school, I got my first job in Krakow, and soon after I was drafted to serve two years in the military. During these years, I learned how to be a disciplined and responsible person, how to work hard, how to save my money and pay my bills. I was fortunate to join a very vibrant youth group in my parish in Krakow which was crucial in the growth of my faith at that time. In 1981, I left my country. In 1994, the turning point in my life, I moved to Linden, NJ and joined a prayer group at St. Teresa Church. Fr. Jan Kwiecien led the group. was very close to people in our parish. We always turned to him whenever there was a problem, or when we needed help or advice. His personal example as a priest, his teaching and his spiritual guidance were very inspiring to me. There were other great priests too, like Fr. Eugene Koch, the Pastor of the parish at that time. This was where I felt my vocation for the first time. I contacted the Vocation Director of our Archdiocese. I participated in many retreats, walking pilgrimages and spiritual workshops. I felt that this was “my way.” Since that time until now, I have celebrated the Holy Eucharist every day. I believe it is this Sacrament that gave me the inspiration and strength to become a priest. I joined a discerning group run by our Vocation Office which was very helpful in my process. I also received other recommendations and help in order to do what was required to enter our Seminary. During that time, “finally” my paper work and academics were completed. I announced to my family in 2000 that I had been accepted to enter the Seminary in our Newark at Seton Hall University for theology formation for priests. I experienced incredible peace and joy in my heart that the Lord had called me to His Priesthood. Personally, to study the mysteries and the beauty of our Catholic faith was and is the greatest joy and privilege for me and this is what I want to share with others – God’s Love. I ask the faithful to pray for me and all the priests serving in our diocese. Thank you and God bless you.


Father Christian G. Scalo, Parochial Vicar

I was born and raised in Essex County, NJ along with my two older sisters, Rosemary who is an attorney, and Judi who is an elementary school teacher. My mother, a middle school teacher at St. Catherine of Siena parish for more than 30 years, nurtured me with such immense love and compassion. In a similar way, my father, a blue-collar mechanic who still works in the garage from 5 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day, showed me the value of hard work and provided me with deep love and a unique patience and understanding that is a testament to his faith in Christ. My two sisters, who are both married to wonderful husbands, have shared their families with me, their joys, their struggles and their celebrations, and blessed me with two nieces and two nephews. My journey toward the Priesthood really began around age 6, although I didn’t know it at the time. I can remember running around the house with the entire towel closet emptied trying to find a suitable altar cloth and robe to “play priest” – one of the first seeds God placed in my very young heart. As I began to mature into high school, I sensed the richness of my call around the age of 16, although at that point, I was still too afraid to accept it. I continued on to college, studying Biology at Immaculata University in Pennsylvania. I graduated Summa Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Science in Biology and have presented my research work at a variety of venues including the Pennsylvania State Capital and the Pennsylvania Academy of Science. As I was nearing graduation, I felt a strong pull in my heart that it was time to fully embrace the Lord’s call to the Priesthood. I announced my decision to enter the seminary to my family on Holy Saturday of the Easter Vigil. They were overjoyed. It seemed like even though I had delayed in coming to this realization, they had known all along that the Priesthood was meant for me. I then decided to make the phone call to the seminary that started my formation. It was one of the best decisions that I have made in my entire life. I have never felt more secure, more comfortable in who I am, and more filled with joy and expectation for the gifts of each new day. It is truly a blessing and honor for me to be assigned to St. Joe’s as a newly ordained priest! I look forward to ministering with and for you all.

3 TWENTY SIXTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME ~ SEPTEMBER 26, 2021 Fr. John Z. Radwan  This was where I felt my vocation for the 1irst time. I contacted the Vocation Director of our Archdiocese.I participated in many retreats, walking pilgrimages and spiritual workshopsI felt that this was “my way.” Since that time until now, I have celebrated the Holy Eucharist every day. I believe it is this Sacrament that gave me the inspiration and strength to become a priest. I joined a discerning group run by our Vocation Of1ice which was very helpful in my process. I also received other recommendations and help in order to do what was required to enter our Seminary. During that time, “1inally” my paper work and academics were completed. I announced to my family in 2000 that I had been accepted to enter the Seminary in our Newark at Seton Hall University for theology formation for priests. I experienced incredible peace and joy in my heart that the Lord had called me to His Personally, to study the mysteries and the beauty of our Catholic faith was and is the greatest joy and privilege for me and this is what I want to share with othersGod’s Love. I ask the faithful to pray for me and all the priests serving in our diocese. Thank you and God bless you.Father JohnFather Christian G. ScaloParochial VicarI was born and raised in Essex County, NJ along with my two older sisters, Rosemary who is an attorney, and Judi who is an elementary school teacher. My mother, a middle school teacher at St. Catherine of Siena parish for more than 30 years, nurtured me with such immense love and compassion. In a similar way, my father, a !collar mechanic who still works in the garage from 5 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day, showed me the value of hard work and provided me with deep love and a unique patience and understanding that is a testament to his faith in Christ. My two sisters, who are both married to wonderful husbands, have shared their families with me, their joys, their struggles and their celebrations, and blessed me with two nieces and two nephews. My journey toward the Priesthood really began around age 6, although I didn’t know it at the time. I can remember running around the house with the entire(continued above)Fr. Christian G. Scalo  towel closet emptied trying to 1ind a suitable altar cloth and robe to “play priest” one of the 1irst seeds God placed in my very young heart. As I began to mature into high school, I sensed the richness of my call around the age of 16, although at that point, I was still too afraid to accept it. I continued on to college, studying Biology at Immaculata University in Pennsylvania. I graduated Summa Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Science in Biology and have presented my research work at a variety of venues including the Pennsylvania State Capital and the Pennsylvania Academy of Science. As I was nearing graduation, I felt a strong pull in my heart that it was time to fully embrace the Lord’s call to the Priesthood. I announced my decision to enter the seminary to my family on Holy Saturday of the Easter Vigil. They were overjoyed. It seemed like even though I had delayed in coming to this realization, they had known all along that the Priesthood was meant for me. I then decided to make the phone call to the seminary that started my formation. It was one of the best decisions that I have made in my entire lifeI have never felt more secure, more comfortable in who I am, and more 1illed with joy and expectation for the gifts of each new day. It is truly a blessing and honor for me to be assigned to St. Joe’s as a newly ordained priest! I look forward to ministering with and for you all. Father Christian